How To Adjust Mountain Bike Shocks?

How much air should I put in my mountain bike shocks?

Eyeball it or use a ruler to measure. If less than 30 percent of the stanchion is showing below the o-ring, unscrew the valve cap on your shock and, using a shock pump, add air —about 10 PSI at a time.

How much air should I put in my shocks?

The proper pressure of an air shock should be between 35 and 75 PSI. If it is any lower than this, the shocks will need to be filled with air.

How much air do I put in my mountain bike forks?

Set up the fork to a pressure where you have between 25%-30% sag. Say, the amount the fork compresses when you get on the bike in normal riding position, has to be like a fourth of the total travel. If your Recon is 130mm travel, it should sink like 36-38mm with your weight on.

Does adjusting preload change ride height?

The suspension may feel stiffer when preload is increased, but that’s because adding preload compresses the spring, so it takes more pressure to move the suspension any further. Adjusting preload simply determines the motorcycle’s ride height. Basically, when ride height is overly high there is too little sag.

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What does preload mean on a mountain bike?

The preload refers to the amount of sag the shock will allow when the bike is at rest with the rider’s weight bearing down on it. Determining the correct preload is important because if it’s too high, it takes more energy to move the shock and compress the springs, resulting in a harder and desensitized shock system.

What PSI should rear shocks be?

Add Air. A good rule of thumb for inflating air shocks is to add 1psi of air for every pound you weigh. Therefore if you weigh 140lb, then begin the set-up process at 140psi. Remember to use an accurate shock pump, as old pumps often have leaks and faulty pressure dials.

Can I put a longer rear shock on my mountain bike?

If you buy a shock that is too long for your bike, it will work well, but it can also damage it. The shock may be too long if your rear tire has moved at all after you installed it. Parts of the frame of your bike may also touch that aren’t supposed to, causing unnecessary damage.

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